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Chaco Culture National Historical Park Archives - The Wonders Expedition™ - @Archeoastronomy

July 23, 2019

History’s Cry–Questions about the Anasazi Indians in Chaco Canyon

By Allen Manning

Captured images of long gone hours working righteously in unison for a common goal now revealing only a structures heart. Bereft of souls upon which each stone was cast lay rubble and sand mixed clays.

Once where children played, animals grazed as people lived out their days, now lizards lounge above snake-infested grounds in empty homes no laughter there abounds.

Anasazi Ruins by Allen Manning

Come see where waters once flowed. Between hovel and home here now only dust clouds fill what once were window sills.

Why build the first Las Vegas of the west to leave these once golden cities of the past to times gamble? Perched between shallow cliffs each covered in golden splatter now only reverberate with tourist chatter. Come listen in dawns early rise the calls of civilizations first American fall. Destined for such are we who build cities of steel to follow those who marked the earth in stone.

Where did they go, when they roamed far a foot, wheeled upon great roads? Are in each who here gather some great part of them that still matters? Or, long gone from our present as from our tomorrow. Will we one day them follow? Or will we they recall and learn the secretes of the Anasazi Doom. @roadmonkeyone

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In Search of the Anasazi and the Cities of Cibola (Gold)

Studying the Anasazi with Allen Manning

North of the main settlements of Chaco Canyon Aztec National Ruins Park holds as many questions as answers. Here alongside cold, fast-flowing waters, Anasazi built a great Kiva and several smaller kivas situated about their five-story-high multi-room complex. Structures that for the most part have stood up to time’s ravages almost didn’t survive the looters.

These doors are taller and wider than most found throughout theses ruins. Looters cut through the three-foot-thick walls as they dug out rooms along the western side of the complex in search of treasures.

Pottery, tools and some artifacts long since taken by the looters rest in private collections and a few museums. As far as archeologist can tell no cache of gold passed out of these doors in the hands of looters.

Doorways of the Anasazi with Allen Manning

In 1542 when Spanish explorer Vasquez de Coronado set out through the region in search of the Seven Cities of Cibola (Gold) he returned without either gold or the cities’ locations.  By the time his men snaked their way through the Chocoan region the inhabitants of this and all the other Anasazi cites had been gone several hundred years.

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Leaving Anasazi Country

 

By Allen Manning

Fires crackled and burned, stones cracked in the intense heat as plaster explodes from overheated walls. Timbers once the structure’s primary unifying agent betray it room by room. Ceilings collapse onto over-weighted upper floors as each dominoes till walls fall stripped of support by a growing fire stormfalling in pieces upon the embers.

Chaco Canyon Anasazi Ruin by Allen Manning

Others abandoned by their builders, used now by passing nomads tending flocks and seeking castoffs from a long fled society.

Chacoan, Anasazi, Hohokam, Patayan or Mogollon, regardless the name current Pueblo descendants may call those who built the ruins that so vividly displays  ancient builders’ technology, they came here first. And here they built a society with roads, astronomy and sophisticated rituals centuries before any other North American people had moved out of single story long houses of wood and mud structures.

Many Kivas and pueblos in the 13 known major Chacoan era Pueblo builders were destroyed by fires. It is not known if any were intently set ablaze by departing builders or by enemy raiders.
Cannibalized  remains at several sights suggest to some grizzly fate befell the builders. But so many questions and so few answers leave us asking, are these builders’ bones, enemies or witches.  Were they cannibalized, or just brutally butchered and burned with the tumbled down buildings.

Questions will be addressed, answers sought from current Pueblo residents and regional experts. But for now this first journey into the great builders of the American West is coming into a close. More research and and a second trip already in the planning stages are underway. I solicit your touts, memories and understandings of the people and their past. There are some 22 Pueblo tribes in the southwest. I seek each for memories and answers.

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Aztec Ruins in the Four Corners Region

Aztec Ruins

Sifting through more material, hearing jaded reports on theories with little support. Yet still the reporter in me continues to dig for answers to a 1500 year old mystery buried in outlying ruins.

#TWEChevy March 14 2012 Near Aztec National Park

Where have they gone and why?  Seeing the faces plowing along numbered paths peering into collapsing rooms I see the ancients.  Small statuesque woman with deep brown complexion smiling as I look into her eyes. Yes they are here still, still in each of us. Why here, why did they leave are we soon to follow their fate?

Aztec ruins reflects similar building to Chaco Canyon, with like eras of rebuilding stretched over miles along the San Juan River.

Thirteen major pueblos criss cross the Chaco Canyon region while other areas hold one apartment development supported by hundreds of smaller remote homesteads.

Many theories fill visitors with confusion. Can one answer fill in every void? Look to our own communities and see if one answer fills in every question.

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Tour Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

Bouncing about along ridged dirt and gravel paths our trek into Chaco Canyon begins a few hours after sunrise. Occasional stops to capture images of the geology and history afford us moments to stretch for the walks ahead.

Pueblo Bonito By Allen Manning

Mungo Pavi ruin just the west of the main entrance is the first stop. Three other pueblos entertain modern visits. Videos and pictures highlighting a people’s life in a land less receptive to habitation now than a thousand years ago I stand astounded and surrounded by others equally as awed.

Circling through crumbling walls and rooms with dirt now filled, once bounding with laughter and cries of a people long from this valley a living here tried.

We stepped through halls long now paths for rabbits and mice, once echoed with leather and yucca fiber sandals.

Seeing the level of construction with each successive rebuilding by Chacoan residents reflects their desire to improve on their past and grow a future.

Wandering from rooms in Pueblo Bonito on the third level of a four story complex abandoned before the first Conquistadors tread through this land other’s voices of wonder recall ancient visitors first visit to the complex.

No warriors stands reflected in the construction rather security from the elements with walls three-feet-thick, many hollow rocks stands filled with sand. Great and small Kivas most round with chimneys and benches for day’s-long ceremonies. Questions of why, why here, why then and why did they leave remain unanswerable. But the answers are there in the faces of the pueblo residents who still inhabit this region. More to come on the next adventure.

RMO – Digging In

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Jemez Springs and Discoveries in Anasazi Country

Today in a small corner of New Mexico I found an archeologist who repeated my own thoughts on things pulled from these sacred grounds.

Jemez State Monument by Allen Manning

Twenty-two known Pueblo nations stand watch over hundreds of diggers rifling through shared histories, ruins and more. Many unwilling to share the paths to the present. But for a few, who are willing to explain, years of misunderstandings come crashing down instead of the walls raised from the ground. Each explanation of a simple artifacts as they are found sheds light and perceptions changed abound.

Sharing thoughts of a seasoned Chaco Canyon digger I heard of the needs shared by the Puebloeans as each grain from their past is swept away. Respect for the dead, understanding for the living and hopes for the future. More of this conversation and more to soon be introduced.

My time here in this pass is short, as the wealth holds out, the voices I need for learning busy seeking next year’s funding.

Oh and not every unknown artifact was some sort of religious piece. How many items in your own home are religious in nature….

In the morning my first visit to Chaco Canyon….

 

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Chevy Delivers 2012 Equinox to Allen Manning for Trip to Anasazi Country

Our own Allen Manning departs Dallas tomorrow headed to the Four Corners Region of the United States to begin work on our interactive book about Chaco Canyon and the Anasazi Indians.  Watch the video of Allen Manning in his 2012 Equinox, Courtesy of @GMTexas

He just took delivery of the car, which will be decked out with identification information about TheWondersExpedition.com and our sponsor, GM of Texas, with the hashtag of #TWEChevy.

Allen’s got some great prizes to give away, too, from those who might spy the car on the road between here and New Mexico.  If you see the car, take a photo of it and then tweet it with the #TWEChevy hashtag.  You might just win some very cool stuff from Chevy!

Again, we offer a special thanks to Vicki Cosgrove of GM Texas for helping make this even possible.

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Your Photo Galleries Are Welcomed!

We’ve added a photo gallery for inclusion on TheWondersExpedition.com and wanted to share with you the opportunity to post some of your visits to some cool sites on our pages.

This image was selected as a picture of the we...

Image via Wikipedia

Do you have photos from:

Just to name a few?

If so, leave a comment and make sure you include your email address when you register.  We’ll be in touch shortly thereafter.  Would you like to offer a guest post on your adventure?  What was it like to be there? Do you have travel tips? The name of a great guide or tour service to use?  Where did you stay?  What were the smells and sounds like?

 

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The Mysteries of Poverty Point, LA, USA–And The Beginnings of The Wonders Expedition™

We’ve been doing a lot of work lately to assemble the core team to launch The Wonders Expedition™ and our other  legacy products that are in development, but back on December 22, 2011, our Founder, Don Claxton and his daughters were at the historic site, Poverty Point/Lower Jackson Mound, near Monroe, Louisiana in the southeastern United States making some pretty curious findings.

The Lower Jackson Mound

The Lower Jackson Mound, which is about eight feet high and more than 130 feet at its widest point, is said to have been built almost 5,400 years ago.  If that is true, and Carbon Dating has suggested that to be the case, that means it was built here in the United States prior to Stonehenge/Woodhenge/Sillbury Hill/The Henge of Avebury in England, AND the Pyramids of Giza in Northern Egypt.

Stop and think about that for a second.  We normally refer to Native American Indians in the historic lore of the United States as “savages.”

Poverty Point, LA

Poverty Point itself was built about one-half mile from Lower Jackson Mound about 1,650 BC, which is about 3,660 years ago, and after Stonehenge and Giza.  It is fascinating nonetheless.

From accounts of local historians, its mounds, like Lower Jackson Mound, were all constructed out of dirt.  “There are no rocks in the area,” we were told.  Certainly no limestone.

But here in the Southeastern United States, just about 20 minutes north of Interstate 20 in Northern Louisiana, mankind once had made this a thriving area of life, civilization and trading.  There are utility rocks that have been found at Poverty Point that were used for spearheads, cooking, idols, etc.  And science has found those rocks came from all over the eastern United States and even as far away as the Great Lakes Region.

The Wonders Expedition™

We won’t argue that there may seemingly be many other more curious and interesting places around the country–Mesa Verde and Chaco Canyon in New Mexico come to mind.  But it is important to not overlook places like Poverty Point as well.  It has tremendous historical value and possesses its own lore and mysteries.

What happened to the people who lived here?  Some suggest they migrated into Meso America and became what we know of as the Olmec.

Just like the Anastazi had a major site in Chaco Canyon and then abandoned their site, or like the people who built Stonehenge used it for many years and then stopped,  similar things seem to have happened here at Poverty Point.

We are in search for answers to many questions that make these places around the world so intriguing.  Thank you for reading.  We invite you to follow us on Twitter for additional updates and to LIKE us on Facebook.  Very soon we will be opening a subscription service so you can receive more frequent updates about the activities we have underway around the world.

 

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