Warning: Use of undefined constant ’WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’ - assumed '’WP_MEMORY_LIMIT’' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /homepages/33/d329251483/htdocs/TWE/TWE/wp-config.php on line 53

Warning: Use of undefined constant ‘256M’ - assumed '‘256M’' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /homepages/33/d329251483/htdocs/TWE/TWE/wp-config.php on line 53

Warning: Use of undefined constant fp_activate - assumed 'fp_activate' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /homepages/33/d329251483/htdocs/TWE/TWE/wp-content/plugins/featured-posts/featured-posts.php on line 132

Warning: Use of undefined constant fp_deactivate - assumed 'fp_deactivate' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /homepages/33/d329251483/htdocs/TWE/TWE/wp-content/plugins/featured-posts/featured-posts.php on line 133

Warning: Use of undefined constant AgmPluginInstaller - assumed 'AgmPluginInstaller' (this will throw an Error in a future version of PHP) in /homepages/33/d329251483/htdocs/TWE/TWE/wp-content/plugins/wordpress-google-maps/wpmu_dev_maps_plugin.php on line 62
Earth Mounds Archives - The Wonders Expedition™ - @Archeoastronomy

July 23, 2019

Maya Xultun Discoveries Fascinating–Prove Once Again No 2012 Doomsday Predicted

The announced discoveries from Xultun in Guatemala prove something that’s not new–archaeologists have been saying there is no evidence to predict a doomsday on Dec. 21, 2012 from Maya ruins. But the beauty of the discovery, their age and their very findings, are amazing and beautiful to review, to think about, and now, for scholars, to spend several years analyzing.

New York Times Photo and Article Reference

Our colleague, Dr. Mark Van Stone, has often repeated to us, even in video accounts on this site, that we still have only found a small, small percentage of the ruins in Mesoamerica and have yet to really unravel many of the mysteries that remain about them.

The discovery of the Maya ruins in Xultun prove this point once again.  Indeed, some of the articles we’ve ready help further emphasize this important point.  There is still so much we do not yet know about the Maya.

Xultun

We talked with Dr. Van Stone yesterday while he’s at the Archaeology Channel’s annual film festival in Eugene, Oregon this weekend.  He was clearly excited about this new find and was still reviewing the details of the findings.

In interviews we recently conducted in Memphis at the Society for American Archaeology, we interviewed Dr. Anthony Aveni of Colgate, one of the four scholars highlighted in the Xultun find.  We now are in the process of churning that video out for inclusion in Dr. Van Stones soon-to-be-release Interactive Book for the iPad–2012: Science and Prophecy of the Ancient Maya.

We congratulate Dr. Aveni, Dr. Bill Saturno, Dr. David Stuart, Franco Rossi, and most of all, Maxwell Chamberlain for their great discovery.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Writings Of The Anasazi Mysteries Left Behind

By Allen Manning

One door’s between fallen floors.  Leaves of past pages turning quickly with few words of explanation. Each step gingerly taken to avoid awakening time’s dusty demons.

I find new questions with fewer answers.

Anasazi Ruins By Allen Manning

Yet onward into tumbling walls hearing ancient voices from the walls call.

“Come to now, see yesterday, help us resell what had till now been forgotten.  The stories laid between the stones.  The hopes wound around beams now on earth prone, there between the ruble where one people roamed, remain the dreams our ancestors once called home.

Not your ancestors you say!

Look in the faces of those who remain and tel me you cannot see someone you know or knew.

Look at the buildings and see what a thousand homes still carry, walls with images long ago captured, not unlike yours; black and white to colors etched.

Where do you go after building great cities of stone and mud?

From where did you come and in what language did you direct each wall’s construction?

Are you still listening, still asking or waiting for a new tongue your story to repeat.

From what navel came your civilization’s birth and into what abyss have you gone?

Civilization marches on.  What name will it carry in our children’s songs?

What name shall we call you brothers, sisters, long gone?

What name?

Setting up interviews with a noted expert in the Chaco people’s world, based right here in Dallas at SMU.  More soon….

@roadmonkeyone

 

 

Anasazi Ruins By Allen Manning

Enhanced by Zemanta

History’s Cry–Questions about the Anasazi Indians in Chaco Canyon

By Allen Manning

Captured images of long gone hours working righteously in unison for a common goal now revealing only a structures heart. Bereft of souls upon which each stone was cast lay rubble and sand mixed clays.

Once where children played, animals grazed as people lived out their days, now lizards lounge above snake-infested grounds in empty homes no laughter there abounds.

Anasazi Ruins by Allen Manning

Come see where waters once flowed. Between hovel and home here now only dust clouds fill what once were window sills.

Why build the first Las Vegas of the west to leave these once golden cities of the past to times gamble? Perched between shallow cliffs each covered in golden splatter now only reverberate with tourist chatter. Come listen in dawns early rise the calls of civilizations first American fall. Destined for such are we who build cities of steel to follow those who marked the earth in stone.

Where did they go, when they roamed far a foot, wheeled upon great roads? Are in each who here gather some great part of them that still matters? Or, long gone from our present as from our tomorrow. Will we one day them follow? Or will we they recall and learn the secretes of the Anasazi Doom. @roadmonkeyone

Enhanced by Zemanta

Mounds in Peru–Separated by 5° – 14° Longitude With North American Mounds

News is circulating the Net today of a discovery of animal-shaped mounds in Peru.  It’s being hailed as something unusual and something much older than the mounds found in North America.  One article notes that the mounds of North America are not nearly as old as these in Peru, which are said to be some 4,000 years of age.  For the most part, this observation seems accurate, save the mound at Lower Jackson Mound in Epps, Louisiana, just about 1/2 mile due south of the Bird Mound at Poverty Point.

The other truly exciting and exceptional piece of information pointed out in Antiquity, included in the articles is the suggestion that the Peruvians were doing archeoastronomic alignments with their mounds, a similar suggestion as to things that may also have happened with those built in North America.

The Wonders Expedition Site GPS Observations

There was one other observation we noted in looking at the work of the Peruvians.  Much was said in the two publications about how curious it is that these mounds happened so far away from the ones in North America and that they do not seem to exist anywhere else on the planet but these two continents.

Not having been able to find the exact GPS coordinates for the two sites found by University of Missouri anthropology professor emeritus Robert Benfer, we are going on the assumption that the two Peruvian sites are close to S 12° and W 77° with varying minutes and seconds.

It is our curious observation, with a world 360° round,  that the North American mounds nearly all can be found within W 82° and W 91° longitude on the map, which puts them between 5° and 14° apart at the most from the Peruvian mounds.  The separation comes from latitude of S 12° and N 32° – 40°.

It would seem to us that this is indeed, more of a matter of them actually not being very far a part at all east-to-west, and begs the question about why, with all the other places on earth, these mounds only seemed to have been built within such a tight band of longitude.

Most of the sites we have observed through our work at The Wonders Expedition seem to have more of a correlation or to be grouped within latitudinal bands.  The fact that these are longitudinally so close to us is the most curious point of all.

Observations of Indian Mounds within the United States by GPS Coordinates, Elevation in Meters, and when it was built and its age:

Historic Location, City, NationLatitudes D M SLongitudes D M SElev in MetrsBC/ADYear BuiltAge
Poverty Point, Epps, LouisianaN32387.00W912418.001,065BC16503,661
Ocmulgee National Monument Mounds, Macon, Georgia, USAN325012.00W833630.00276AD10501,000
Monk's Mound, Cahokia, Illinois, USAN383917.31W90349.08128AD9501,061
Cancho Roano, Zalamea de la Serena, Badajoz, SpainN38423.93E5419.68412BC5502,561
The Great Serpent Mound, OhioN39127.97W822548.47238AD1070941
Moorehead Circle, Fort Ancient Woodhenge, Oregonia, OhioN392425.43W84559.39206AD112,000
Fort Ancient SunWatch Villiage, Dayton, OhioN394255.65W841355.5220AD112,000
The Earthworks of Newark, OH, USAN40221.11W825544.08260AD2501,761
Mounds State Park, Anderson, IndianaN40543.45W853722.54160BC1602,171

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Tour Pueblo Bonito, Chaco Canyon, New Mexico

Bouncing about along ridged dirt and gravel paths our trek into Chaco Canyon begins a few hours after sunrise. Occasional stops to capture images of the geology and history afford us moments to stretch for the walks ahead.

Pueblo Bonito By Allen Manning

Mungo Pavi ruin just the west of the main entrance is the first stop. Three other pueblos entertain modern visits. Videos and pictures highlighting a people’s life in a land less receptive to habitation now than a thousand years ago I stand astounded and surrounded by others equally as awed.

Circling through crumbling walls and rooms with dirt now filled, once bounding with laughter and cries of a people long from this valley a living here tried.

We stepped through halls long now paths for rabbits and mice, once echoed with leather and yucca fiber sandals.

Seeing the level of construction with each successive rebuilding by Chacoan residents reflects their desire to improve on their past and grow a future.

Wandering from rooms in Pueblo Bonito on the third level of a four story complex abandoned before the first Conquistadors tread through this land other’s voices of wonder recall ancient visitors first visit to the complex.

No warriors stands reflected in the construction rather security from the elements with walls three-feet-thick, many hollow rocks stands filled with sand. Great and small Kivas most round with chimneys and benches for day’s-long ceremonies. Questions of why, why here, why then and why did they leave remain unanswerable. But the answers are there in the faces of the pueblo residents who still inhabit this region. More to come on the next adventure.

RMO – Digging In

Enhanced by Zemanta

Jemez Springs and Discoveries in Anasazi Country

Today in a small corner of New Mexico I found an archeologist who repeated my own thoughts on things pulled from these sacred grounds.

Jemez State Monument by Allen Manning

Twenty-two known Pueblo nations stand watch over hundreds of diggers rifling through shared histories, ruins and more. Many unwilling to share the paths to the present. But for a few, who are willing to explain, years of misunderstandings come crashing down instead of the walls raised from the ground. Each explanation of a simple artifacts as they are found sheds light and perceptions changed abound.

Sharing thoughts of a seasoned Chaco Canyon digger I heard of the needs shared by the Puebloeans as each grain from their past is swept away. Respect for the dead, understanding for the living and hopes for the future. More of this conversation and more to soon be introduced.

My time here in this pass is short, as the wealth holds out, the voices I need for learning busy seeking next year’s funding.

Oh and not every unknown artifact was some sort of religious piece. How many items in your own home are religious in nature….

In the morning my first visit to Chaco Canyon….

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Chevy Delivers 2012 Equinox to Allen Manning for Trip to Anasazi Country

Our own Allen Manning departs Dallas tomorrow headed to the Four Corners Region of the United States to begin work on our interactive book about Chaco Canyon and the Anasazi Indians.  Watch the video of Allen Manning in his 2012 Equinox, Courtesy of @GMTexas

He just took delivery of the car, which will be decked out with identification information about TheWondersExpedition.com and our sponsor, GM of Texas, with the hashtag of #TWEChevy.

Allen’s got some great prizes to give away, too, from those who might spy the car on the road between here and New Mexico.  If you see the car, take a photo of it and then tweet it with the #TWEChevy hashtag.  You might just win some very cool stuff from Chevy!

Again, we offer a special thanks to Vicki Cosgrove of GM Texas for helping make this even possible.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Your Photo Galleries Are Welcomed!

We’ve added a photo gallery for inclusion on TheWondersExpedition.com and wanted to share with you the opportunity to post some of your visits to some cool sites on our pages.

This image was selected as a picture of the we...

Image via Wikipedia

Do you have photos from:

Just to name a few?

If so, leave a comment and make sure you include your email address when you register.  We’ll be in touch shortly thereafter.  Would you like to offer a guest post on your adventure?  What was it like to be there? Do you have travel tips? The name of a great guide or tour service to use?  Where did you stay?  What were the smells and sounds like?

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

A Fact About Ancient Sites–The Power of Community and Common Purpose

Much has been written and said about the ancient sites that confound us today with their mysteries about their origins, purposes, and the techniques used to build them.

But one essential fact needs to be thought about–these sites were built with a lot of cooperation from what had to be population centers of significant size and united behind a common goal.

Great Wall of China near Jinshanling

Image via Wikipedia

The Pyramids once were said to have been built with slave labor.  Until recently, that seems to have been disproved and that there were actually commissioned craftsmen who built them.

Stonehenge in England took a lot of work to be built; just dragging the stones several hundred miles, let alone hoisting them into place.  So did Gobekli Tepe in Turkey and then there was the Great Wall of China.  Don’t forget about the pyramids in South America, the temples throughout Cambodia, Thailand and India, and the incredible mounds located in the United States such as Poverty Point and the Monk’s Mounds, at Cahokia, in Illinois.

The point is, each of these places took the cooperation, coordination and the combined labor of thousands of people–their local communities, with people giving up their time and effort in this thing we call life to build something bigger than themselves, that ultimately, has stood the test of time.

The question for discussion here is do we, in 2012, hold a candle to their levels of determination, grit and desire to see a project to completion?

Enhanced by Zemanta

TWE Pinterest Site

We’ve been working on our photo collection of Wonders sites around the world and finally have launched a Pinterest page we are excited to share with you.

Already people are beginning to pin some of the curious points we’ve included, and literally, we are just get started.

English: Red Pinterest logo

Image via Wikipedia

But we can’t help but noticing the way that all these photos combined on one long scrolling screen just further points out the incredible similarities we’re trying to emphasize via The Wonders Expedition.  And to us, that makes what’s happening with Pinterest, pretty cool and amazing.

Do you have photos you’d like to add to our collection?  Send us the links and we’ll be happy to add them if they’re in the scope of TWE.

Enhanced by Zemanta
ChatClick here to chat!+